Four Ways to Get Started with OneSpan Sign

Michael Williams, July 28, 2015
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The four ways to use OneSpan Sign are using the provided UI, the Java SDK, the .NET SDK, and the REST API. Throughout the previous 8 weeks, I have created simple tutorial blogs showing step-by-step examples of how you can get started with each of these methods, in a series named "OneSpan Sign for New Users". This short blog will give a quick summary of each way to get started with OneSpan Sign and a link to the full blog text.

 

 

 

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OneSpan Sign Web UI

Get Started with eSignLive - IntroStep1

Create and Send a Package

This was the first entry in the series. In this blog, I cover signing up for a Sandbox account, creating a new package, adding signers and documents, placing signatures on the documents, and finally sending the document package to all signers.

sampleAgreementWithSignatureBoxes

 
In this follow up blog, I continued on from where the first blog ended. The package had just been sent to all signers. Since this was the first method shown in the series, this blog walked through the signing process as experienced by the sender and signers, downloading the documents and evidence summary, and finally, archiving and deleting a package.

 

 

 


OneSpan Sign Java SDK

code

Create and Send a Package

This was the first blog in the series to step into code. This post covered downloading the Java SDK, downloading the Eclipse Java IDE, creating and configuring a Java project, and all of the code needed to create and send a document package from a simple Java class.

 

code

 
Continuing on with the simple Java SDK example, this blog discussed how to find the package ID of the document package created in the first blog in this section. Using that ID, the package was accessed. The package status and signing status were then checked. Based on the signing status, the completed document package documents and evidence summary are downloaded.

 

 

 

 


 

OneSpan Sign .NET SDK

Robot with tools and SDK sign. Technology concept

Create and Send a Package

The second of the SDKs was covered much like the first. This post shows how to download the .NET SDK and Microsoft Visual Studio, how to create and configure a C# project, and finally shows the code needed to create and send a document package.

C# concept green background with blue text

 
As with the first blog in this section, this post follows the same path as its equivalent in the Java SDK section. It shows how to find the package ID of the document package, accessing the package, checking the package status and the signing status, and finally downloading the documents and evidence summary after completion of the signing process.

 

 

 

 


OneSpan Sign REST API

Pixelated acronym API made from cubes, mosaic pattern

Create and Send a Package

The final section of the "OneSpan Sign for New Users" series was a slight change of pace. In this blog, I went one step further than the SDKs and used the REST API directly. I use C# in Microsoft Visual Studio, like in the .NET SDK blogs, so I jump right into the code. After showing the code in its entirety, I walk through the code, including how to create the HttpClient, set up the headers, set up the multipart form with the file data and JSON payload, and finally send the POST request.

Application programming interface sign. Technology concept

 
With the last blog in the series, I continued with Microsoft Visual Studio and C# and showed the code used to send GET requests to find the package status and signing status and then to download the completed documents and evidence summary after completion of signing.

 

 

 


Thanks for reading! If you have any questions or there are any topics you would like to see covered in my blog, feel free to post in the comments section. If you want to see more posts from me, see my author page.

– Michael Williams
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